Category Archives: Mammals

The Winner!

The Winner!

To the victor the spoils!

This is a follow up image to those in the last two posts. After all the fuss, fighting and commotion, along came this Spotted Hyena and claimed the remains for himself!

Spotted Hyena  Crocuta crocuta

The Spotted Hyena, also known as the laughing hyena, is a species of hyena, currently classed as the sole member of the genus Crocuta, native to Sub-Saharan Africa. It is listed as Least Concern by the IUCN on account of its widespread range and large numbers estimated between 27,000 and 47,000 individuals. The species is however experiencing declines outside of protected areas due to habitat loss and poaching.

This image was captured in the Masai Mara conservancy, south west Kenya, East Africa.

View this and similar images on my Flickr site — Duncan’s Flickr Page

©2015 Duncan Blackburn

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The more the merrier!

The more the merrier!

This image is the companion image to that in the previous post.

No sooner had the Lappet-faced Vulture and Black-backed Jackal begun to size each other up, when out of the sky came a White-headed Vulture! The competition for the remains of the hippo calf just became more intense!

White-headed Vulture Trigonoceps occipitalis

The white-headed vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis) is an Old World vulture endemic to Africa. It has a pink beak and a white crest, and the featherless areas on its head are pale. Its has dark brown upper parts and black tail feathers. The feathers on its lower parts and legs are white. It has a wing span of 2 m and spends a lot of time soaring looking for food. It roosts in tall trees near to water at night.

This image was captured in the Masai Mara conservancy, south west Kenya, East Africa.

View this and similar images on my Flickr site — Duncan’s Flickr Page

©2015 Duncan Blackburn

Stand off!

Stand off!

Shortly after arriving in the Masai Mara we learnt that some lions had killed a hippo calf. We went in search of the kill site only to find a stand-off between a Lappet-faced Vulture and a Black-backed Jackal!

Lappet-faced Vulture  Torgos tracheliotos

This is an Old World vulture belonging to the bird order Accipitriformes, which also includes eagles, kites, buzzards and hawks. It is the only member of the genus Torgos. It is not closely related to the superficially similar New World vultures, and does not share the good sense of smell of some members of that group. The Lappet-faced Vulture is a huge species, ranking as the longest and largest winged vulture.

Black-backed Jackal  Canis mesomelas

The Black-backed Jackal is a canid native to Africa. Compared to other members of the genus Canis, the black-backed jackal is a very ancient species, and has changed little since the Pleistocene, being the most basal canine alongside the closely related side-striped jackal. It is a fox-like canid with a reddish coat and a black saddle that extends from the shoulders to the base of the tail. It is a monogamous animal, whose young may remain with the family to help raise new generations of pups. The black-backed jackal is not a fussy eater, and will feed on small to medium sized animals, as well as plant matter and human refuse.

This image was captured in the Masai Mara conservancy, south west Kenya, East Africa.

View this and similar images on my Flickr site — Duncan’s Flickr Page

©2015 Duncan Blackburn

Beauties!

Beauties!

Cheetah  Acinonyx jubatus

These are the same cheetah brothers as featured in the previous post.

This image was captured in the Masai Mara conservancy, south west Kenya, East Africa.

View this and similar images on my Flickr site — Duncan’s Flickr Page

©2015 Duncan Blackburn

Quick and Deadly!

Quick and Deadly!

Quick and Deadly! 2

 

Quick and Deadly!

An earlier post – “Brotherly Love” – contained an image of two cheetah brothers after an unsuccessful hunt of an Impala ram.

These images show one of the brothers in full flight attempting to run down the Impala. The two extremes of his stride show that in the first image the back paws are in front of the front paws; while the second image shows the opposite extreme of the cheetah’s stride when at full speed. All four feet are off the ground and his body is fully extended!

In this particular instance he was quick but not deadly!

 Cheetah  Acinonyx jubatus

The cheetah is a large feline (family Felidae, subfamily Felinae) inhabiting most of Africa and parts of Iran. It is the only extant member of the genus Acinonyx. The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 112 to 120 km/h (70 to 75 mph) in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m (1,600 ft), and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in three seconds.

The cheetah is a unique felid, with its closest living relatives being the puma and jaguarundi of the Americas. This cat is notable for modifications in the species’ paws, being one of the few felids with only semi-retractable claws. [Ref: Wikipedia]

This image was captured in the Masai Mara conservancy, south west Kenya, East Africa.

View this and similar images on my Flickr site — Duncan’s Flickr Page

©2015 Duncan Blackburn

 

 

Relaxing!

Relaxing!

Lion  Panthera leo

When you are at the top of the food chain, you can afford to relax in the afternoon sunshine!

This image was captured in the Masai Mara conservancy, south west Kenya, East Africa.

View this and similar images on my Flickr site — Duncan’s Flickr Page

©2015 Duncan Blackburn

Brotherly Love!

Brotherly Love!

Cheetah  Acinonyx jubatus

These two brothers are seen taking a “freshening up” break after an unsuccessful hunt of an Impala ram. This behaviour can also be construed as mutual commiseration after the failure and the prospect of sleeping hungry that night.

The cheetah is a large feline (family Felidae, subfamily Felinae) inhabiting most of Africa and parts of Iran. It is the only extant member of the genus Acinonyx. The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 112 to 120 km/h (70 to 75 mph) in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m (1,600 ft), and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in three seconds.

The cheetah is a unique felid, with its closest living relatives being the puma and jaguarundi of the Americas. This cat is notable for modifications in the species’ paws, being one of the few felids with only semi-retractable claws. [Ref: Wikipedia]

This image was captured in the Masai Mara conservancy, south west Kenya, East Africa.

 View this and similar images on my Flickr site — Duncan’s Flickr Page

©2015 Duncan Blackburn